CCD - Communication, Culture and Diversity

The multi-disciplinary and international network-based research group CCD, Communication, Culture and Diversity, focuses on issues of learning and communication inside and outside institutional educational settings (for instance, preschool, compulsory school, upper secondary school and adult education) and places of work (for instance, government agencies, health care sector, non-for-profit establishments, etc). 

CCD International Seminar Series Autumn 2020 (and Save the dates for 2021)

Communication, Culture and Diversity, CCD (www.ju.se/ccd)

Convened by Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta, professor

Scientific leader CCD research environment

Seminar Chairs Ylva Lindberg, professor and Giulia Messina Dahlberg, assistant professor

Senior and co-leaders CCD research environment

Welcome!

Overarching theme for Autumn 2020: Monolingualism, Multilingualism

28 August 2020, 10-12, Zoom

Dr. Rafael Lomeu Gomes, Assistant professor

https://www.hf.uio.no/multiling/english/people/phd-fellows/rafaellg/

Faculty of Humanities

University of Oslo, Norway

Title: Family multilingualism through a ‘translingual lens’: Current theoretical orientations and challenges (see enclosed flyer)

Seminar reading:

  1. Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta and Giulia Messina Dahlberg. 2018. Meaning-making or Heterogeneity in the Areas of Language and Identity? The Case of Translanguaging and Nyanlända (Newly-arrived) across Time and Space, International Journal of Multilingualism, 15:4, 383-411, DOI: 10.1080/14790718.2018.1468446
  2. Lomeu Gomes, Rafael. 2020. Talking Multilingual Families into Being: Language Practices and Ideologies of a Brazilian-Norwegian Family in Norway, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, DOI: 10.1080/01434632.2020.1788037


Convened by Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta, professor

Jönköping University

Date: 28 August 2020

Time: 10-12pm

Location: Zoom

Family multilingualism through a ‘translingual lens’: Current theoretical orientations and challenges

In the past five years or so, sociolinguistic approaches to family multilingualism have been marked by an ever-increasing diversity of theoretical orientations (Curdt-Christiansen 2018, Lanza and Lomeu Gomes 2020). Among these orientations, one that has received particular attention takes a practice-based perspective and draws on understandings of languages as fluid, dynamic, and localised (as opposed to abstract entities that can be neatly separated, counted, and labelled). Building on this discussion, in the first part of this seminar, I point to the ways in which the employment of a ‘translingual lens’ can be useful in making sense of the connections between language practices and ideologies of family members in multilingual houses. In particular, I present part of a three-year ethnographically oriented study undertaken in Oslo, Norway to discuss how monoglossic language ideologies may influence parent-child interactions in the home (Lomeu Gomes 2020). This analytical move may illuminate certain questions overlooked by current literature on child bilingualism. Yet, its employment risks reifying taken-for-granted understandings of language and losing its innovative explanatory potential (Bagga-Gupta and Messina Dahlberg 2018, Pennycook 2016). In the second, and final, part of the seminar, the following question is posed: to what extent can the employment of a ‘translingual lens’ be reconciled with the efforts of parents who aim at fostering practices that may lead to the maintenance of the so-called home language(s)? Rather than reaching definite answers, it is expected that the discussion in this seminar triggers reflections concerning the challenging task of doing socially relevant research that may inform practices in the home and in society at large.

References

Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta and Giulia Messina Dahlberg. 2018. Meaning-making or Heterogeneity in the Areas of Language and Identity? The Case of Translanguaging and Nyanlända (Newly-arrived) across Time and Space, International Journal of Multilingualism, 15:4, 383-411, DOI: 10.1080/14790718.2018.1468446

Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao Lan. 2018. “Family Language Policy.” In The Oxford Handbook of Language Policy and Planning, edited by James Tollefson, and Miguel Perez-Milans, 420–441. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lanza, Elizabeth, and Rafael Lomeu Gomes. 2020. “Family Language Policy: Foundations, Theoretical Perspectives and Critical Approaches.” In Handbook of Home Language Maintenance and Development: Social and Affective Factors, edited by Susana A. Schalley and Susana A. Eisenchlas, 153–173. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Lomeu Gomes, Rafael. 2020. Talking Multilingual Families into Being: Language Practices and Ideologies of a Brazilian-Norwegian Family in Norway, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, DOI: 10.1080/01434632.2020.1788037

Pennycook, Alastair. 2016. “Mobile Times, Mobile Terms: The Trans-super-poly-metro Movement.” In Sociolinguistics: Theoretical Debates, edited by Nikolas Coupland, 201– 216. Cambridge: Cambridge Universit

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9 October 2020, 10-12, Zoom

Dr. David Gramling, Associate professor

https://german.arizona.edu/people/dgl

College of Humanities

The University of Arizona, USA

Title: What’s happening in Late Monolingualism?

(the seminar will discuss multilingualism versus. translanguaging and individual monolingualism versus modern / late modern monolingualism as a historical frame).

Seminar reading: Introduction, Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 from Dr. David Gramling’s forthcoming book The Invention of Multilingualism (available from Susanne.smithberger@ju.se on request).

 

20 November 2020, 10-12, Zoom

Dr. Alan Carneiro, Assistant professor

https://www.unifesp.br/campus/gua/docentes-letras/1647-alan-silvio-ribeiro-carneiro

Escola de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas

Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

Title: Analysing communicative repertoires and social change. The dynamics of language regimes in Timor-Leste

Seminar reading: TBA in early August

Analysing communicative repertoires and social change. The dynamics of language regimes in Timor-Leste

Timor-Leste is a small Southeast Asian country, which became independent in 2002, its Constitution recognizes two languages as official, Portuguese, which was chosen because of its history in the territory and Tetun, a standardized version of a local language variety. Beyond the official languages, the Constitution gives the status of working languages to English and Indonesian and of national languages to the two dozens of different local indigenous languages. In this multilingual setting, the use of these different languages and the multiple forms of transidiomatic practices - or in other words, transglossic practices (Cox and Assis-Peterson, 2007) - regulate social interactions in diverse social contexts. The main aim of this paper is to characterize hegemonic language ideologies about these languages and these different transglossic practices and their role in the mediation of communicative practices, the construction of linguistic hierarchies and social distinction in the country. This research is based on an ethnographic study about the local language in education policies, which had a focus on the role of Portuguese language teachers in their implementation. The data to be analysed are the metasociolinguistic stances (Jaffe, 2009) of these language teachers in life narratives and the way they position themselves in relation to the different local languages and transglossic practices. Their different stances index the ways the use of different languages are metapragmatically regulated (Wortham, 2001), structuring a specific local language regime (Kroskrity, 2000), but also to the metapragmatics of transglossic practices and the ways they can be part of new processes of enregisterment (Agha, 2004) and the construction of new language regimes. These dynamics of shift in language ideologies in the country points out for a process of social change in the value of languages, language practices and their speakers along the time and the ways that legitimate languages and legitimate speakers are or can be potentially constructed in these different timescales. If by one side, these language regimes can exclude as they are constantly reaffirming borders, by the other side, there are also possibilities for the subversion and redrawing of identities through the creative use of language resources.

Agha, A. (2004). Registers of Language. In: DURANTI, A. (Ed.) A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology (p. 23-45), Oxford: Blackwell.

Assis-Peterson, A.A., & Cox., M. I. P. (2007). Transculturalidade e Transglossia: para compreender o fenômeno das fricções linguístico-culturais em sociedades contemporâneas sem nostalgia. In S. M. Bortoni-Ricardo & M. C. Cavalcanti (Eds.), Transculturalidade, Linguagem e Educação (pp. 23-43). Campinas, SP: Mercado de Letras.

Jaffe, A. (Ed.) (2009). Stance: Sociolinguistic Perspectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kroskrity, P. (Ed.) (2000). Regimes of Language: Ideologies, Polities and Identities. Santa Fe, New Mexico: School of American Research Press.

Wortham, S. (2001). Language ideology and educational research. Linguistics & Education, 12, p. 253-259.

Alan Carneiro is an Assistant Professor of Language Policy and Planning at the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) (2017 to the present). He was a lecturer of Portuguese language at the University of Cape Town (UCT), from 2015 to 2017. He holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics (2014), in the area of Multiculturalism, Multilingualism and Bilingual Education, from the University of Campinas (UNICAMP). His thesis is related to the teaching of Portuguese in the multilingual setting of Timor-Leste, where he taught at Universidade Nacional Timor Lorosa’e.

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CCD International Seminar Series Autumn 2021

Communication, Culture and Diversity, CCD (www.ju.se/ccd)

Convened by Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta, professor

Scientific leader CCD research environment

Save the DATES

CCD International Seminar Series 2021

5 Feb 2021 (10-12 or 13-15)

16 April 2021 (10-12 or 13-15)

4 June 2021 (10-12 or 13-15)

20 August 2021 (10-12 or 13-15)

15 October 2021 (10-12 or 13-15)

3 December 2021 (10-12 or 13-15)

Central focus areas

CCD was established during the second half of the 1990’s at Örebro University, the CCD group moved to the School of Education and Communication at Jönköping University in 2016.

The three central terms: Communication, Culture and Diversity, come together in CCD with the purpose to form a perspective and a point of departure for research on communication in analogue-digital-virtual-real settings. Each of the terms function as an object of study as well as methodological and theoretical points of departure.

  • Communication focuses upon how meaning and messages are constructed, diffused, interpreted and transformed in analogue-digital environments where human-beings – children, young people and adults – engage in social practices.
  • Culture, an aspect of all social life, is used as an analytical point of departure to understand processes that are part of social and historical patterns and norms which shape contexts where people (inter)act. Cultural expressions and the circulation of media and genres across modalities, literature, film etc, also constitute research objects within CCD.
  • Diversity is a concept used to understand how social categories and various cultures, for example, ethnicity, functionality, class, or gender, get (co)created and become (in)visible across a range of arenas.

These three areas or concepts are linked and focused upon through different approaches in the research carried out within CCD. Several disciplines, the educational sciences, language and literature studies, media and communication sciences, deaf studies, gender research, amongst others, come together in the CCD network and its different projects with the ambition of developing knowledge about communication and participation in the contemporary media landscape within and across national boundaries.

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Research context 

The digitized era and the contemporary global world that is marked by mobility and migration have created new conditions for human-beings in general, and the research enterprise more specifically. These make it necessary to (re)consider the conditions for communication or languaging, as well as for learning and identity production. Currently, analogue and digital dimensions are understood as being blurred and interdependent, just as accumulation, density and change, are considered to be fundamental features of media landscapes.

New media categories are steadily developed through technology innovations such as virtual reality. Media products for information, entertainment and education are accumulating and creating today’s dense media landscapes. The changing features of these modality rich webs of meaning are a challenge to learning and communication inside and outside institutional educational settings and places of work.

In an ever changing landscape of digital technology and media, communicative practices and patterns of interaction between people are in a state of constant transformation. Individuals and groups are continuously involved in learning processes in order to understand how to choose technology, media and genres for different situations, and how to link these.

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Research goal

The research established and conducted within CCD strives to critically understand the premises for communication and participation within and across a range of analogue/real-digital/virtual contexts inside and outside educational and professional settings. The current research projects at CCD address the following themes or issues:

  1. Language policies; for communication in language learning and multilingual settings.
  2. Community affiliation; related to groups that are considered marginalized. The research provides insights with regards to processes of inclusion and exclusion in society for, for instance, differently-abled children and people and migrants.
  3. Pedagogical tools; research focuses upon the ways in which pedagogical tools for meaning making, reading and writing, in media dense, modality rich, and local-global contexts are shaped and used across educational and work-place settings.

A key goal of the research conducted within CCD is to illuminate the complex processes involved in communicative practices, in particular with regards to contemporary, and historical diversified and marginalized demographics of local-global communities. This knowledge production has the potential to provide insights regarding the situated and distributed nature of social practices and the nature of inclusion and exclusion.

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Academic Social Responsibility

Building upon the research work established and conducted within the CCD network-based group, the think tank DoIT (Delaktighet och inkludering [participation and inclusion]) was established in 2016. DoIT organizes regular cross-sectorial seminars hosted by CCD in Jönköping, Örebro County Theater in Örebro and the National Theater in Hallunda, Stockholm.

Representatives from different societal sectors, such as theater and culture, civil society, police, politicians, local and national NGO’s, entrepreneurs, the Swedish Public Employment Service, Insurance Agency, researchers, etc participate in whole day workshops. These workshops bring together the fields of practice and research through thematized encounters where researchers, professionals and clients discuss contemporary issues.

DoIT attempts to formulate dilemmas and problems in communication, for instance, where different groups are involved, and jointly elaborate on practices that can cater for the participation and inclusion of everyone.

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Contact

Ylva Lindberg, Senior research leader

Giulia Messina Dahlberg, Junior research leader

Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta, Scientific head

Pia Åman, Administrator

Content updated 2020-08-07